A collection of flora from the pacific wonderland.

Wild Ginger (Asarum caudatum)

Cone Peak Trail, near Iron Mountain, OR, 7/2014.

Cone Peak Trail, near Iron Mountain, OR, 7/2014.

This strange dark flower grows close to the forest floor, requiring one to hunt under the tell-tale heart-shaped leaves to find it.  Its discovery can make your day!

Burnt Lake Trail, Mount Hood N.F., OR, 7/2013.

Burnt Lake Trail, Mount Hood N.F., OR, 7/2013.

The flower has no petals, only sepals, which, in the northwest species, end in long threads or tails, giving it the Latin caudatum, meaning “tailed.”  The East Coast variety was widely gathered by early settlers as a ginger substitute.  All parts give off a ginger-like smell when broken or crushed.

Hamilton Mountain Trail, Columbia Gorge, WA, 7/2014.

Hamilton Mountain Trail, Columbia Gorge, WA, 7/2014.

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2 responses

  1. You are right about one “making your day”. I encountered one today for the first time in the Cabinet Mountains Wilderness.

    July 29, 2013 at 8:06 pm

    • Amazing! We saw our first about a month ago on the Dog Mountain Trail, but were unable to get a usable photo. Thought we would have to wait a year until we saw a bunch of them on Mt. Hood this weekend.

      July 30, 2013 at 10:13 am

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