A collection of flora from the pacific wonderland.

edible

Serviceberry (Amelanchier alnifolia)

Tom McCall Preserve, Columbia Gorge, OR 4/2013.

Tom McCall Preserve, Columbia Gorge, OR 4/2013.

Also known as “Saskatoon berry”, “juneberry”, and  “shadberry.”  (more…)

Advertisements

Kinnikinnick (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi)

Silver Star Mountain, Columbia Gorge, WA,  6/2013.

Silver Star Mountain, Columbia Gorge, WA, 6/2013.

The name is a Native American word meaning “something to smoke,”  referring to their use of the dried  leaves of this plant, sometimes mixed with tobacco.  (more…)


Yellow Water Lily (Nuphar polysepalum)

Burnt Lake, Mount Hood N.F., OR, 7/2013.

Burnt Lake, Mount Hood N.F., OR, 7/2013.

Like some other water plants (including rice) the water lily gives off alcohol instead of carbon dioxide.

(more…)


Bistort aka Mountain Dock (Polygonum bistortoides)

Lookout Mountain, OR, 7/2013.

Lookout Mountain, OR, 7/2013.

We’ve also seen this called American Bistort, Mountain Meadow Knotweed, and (no kidding)  Smokeweed.

(more…)


Wild Ginger (Asarum caudatum)

Cone Peak Trail, near Iron Mountain, OR, 7/2014.

Cone Peak Trail, near Iron Mountain, OR, 7/2014.

This strange dark flower grows close to the forest floor, requiring one to hunt under the tell-tale heart-shaped leaves to find it.  Its discovery can make your day! (more…)


Taper-tip Onion (Allium acuminatum)

Labyrinth Trail, Columbia Gorge, WA,  6/2013

Labyrinth Trail, Columbia Gorge, WA, 6/2013.

All species of wild onion, including this one, are edible. (more…)


Coast Manroot aka Wild Cucumber (Marah oreganus)

4/2013.  Rowena Plateau, Tom McCall Preserve, Columbia Gorge, OR

Rowena Plateau, Tom McCall Preserve, Columbia Gorge, OR  4/2013.

(more…)


Red Flowering Currant (Ribes sanguineum)

Beacon Rock, Columbia Gorge, OR  4/2012.

Beacon Rock, Columbia Gorge, WA  4/2012.

(more…)


Bitter Root (Lewisia rediviva)

Catherine Creek Trail, Gifford Pinchot National Forest, WA. 4/2013.

Catherine Creek Trail, Gifford Pinchot National Forest, WA. 4/2013.

Easy to miss, the early spring Bitter root appears to survive with little  support. (more…)


Common Camas (Camassia quamash)

Lacamas County Park, Columbia Gorge, WA, 4/2015.

Lacamas County Park, Columbia Gorge, WA, 4/2015.

The edible root of this spring flowering plant has a rich history.  Easily confused with the poisonous Death Camas once the flowers are gone, as the rest of the plants are nearly identical and the two often grow in the same areas.   Native Americans are thought to have weeded the Death Camas from large fields during flowering so that they could later harvest the edible camas without worry. (more…)