A collection of flora from the pacific wonderland.

pea

White Sweetvetch (Hedysarum sulphurescens)

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Boundary Trail, Horseshoe Basin, Pasayten Wilderness, WA, 7/2016.

Grizzly food! Good thing we didn’t know this fact (more…)


Yakima Milk-vetch (Astragalus reventiformis)

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Dalles Mountain Road, Columbia Gorge, WA, 4/2014.

Yakima is the name of a group or tribe of Native Americans who live in Washington state.   (more…)


Tomcat Clover (Trifolium willdenovii)

Catherine Creek Trail, Gifford Pinchot National Forest, WA. 4/2013.

Catherine Creek Trail, Gifford Pinchot National Forest, WA. 4/2013.

Also known as Sand Clover, it was formerly named  tridentatum.  Named after Carl Ludwig Willdenow (1765-1812), a German botanist.


Golden-pea (Thermopsis montana var. ovata)

Silver Star Mountain, Columbia Gorge, WA, 6/2014.

Silver Star Mountain, Columbia Gorge, WA, 6/2014.

This attractive plant is sometimes called “false lupine” due to its resemblance to another pea family member and other times, “mountain goldenbanner.” (more…)


Big-Head Clover (Trifolium macrocephalum)

Grassy Knoll Trail, Columbia Gorge, WA, 5/2013.

Grassy Knoll Trail, Columbia Gorge, WA, 5/2013.

The palmately divided leaves, looking much like those of the lupine, are a giveaway that it’s in the pea family.  It’s underground rhizome roots can result in a large area covered with the small blooms.  The most showy of the clovers, it differs from other trifolium by locating only in thin dry gravelly soil.  (more…)


Bird’s Foot Trefoil (Lotus corniculatus)

Mt. Hood N.W.A., OR, 7/2012.

…more…


Broad-leaf Lupine (Lupinus latifolius)

Lost Pass, Olympic NP. 8/2010.

All Lupines share the easily identifiable palmate leaf. Particular lupine species are notoriously difficult to identify.    (more…)