A collection of flora from the pacific wonderland.

buttercup

Western Meadowrue (Thalictrum occidentale)

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Upper Royal Basin, Olympic National Park, WA, 7/2016.

In moist meadows or forests you will often see these odd looking plants.  (more…)

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Thin-petal Larkspur (Delphinium lineapetalum)

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Leavenworth Ski Hill, Wenatchee National Forest, 5/2017.

The monkshood we posted recently was named Aconitum delphinifolium, as its leaves resembled that of a delphinium, or Larkspur.  (more…)


Northern Monkshood (Aconitum delphinifolium)

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Lower Dewey Lake, Skagway, AK, 7/2017.

We’re posting this Northern Monkshood, found on the westside flower garden bordering Lower Dewey lake above Skagway, Alaska this summer, even though we’ve not yet posted the more common western columbianum Monkshood.   (more…)


Oregon Anemone (Anemone oregana)

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Crescent Mountain Trail, Willamette National Forest, OR, 6/2017.

Thanks to Ross & Chambers’ classic Wildflowers of the Western Cascades (a flora of Iron Mountain which, coincidentally, is just a few miles west on Oregon Highway 20 from where these pictures were taken), we now can differentiate Anemone oregana from the very similar lyallii. (more…)


Upland Larkspur (Delphinium nuttallianum)

Tom McCall Nature Preserve, Columbia Gorge, OR, 3/2015.

Rowena Plateau, Tom McCall Nature Preserve, Columbia Gorge, OR, 3/2015.

If you’re seeing larkspur now (early spring) in the Northwest, chances are that it’s this variety.  Also called “Common Larkspur”. (more…)


Baneberry (Actaea rubra)

Hamilton Mountain Trail, Columbia Gorge, WA, 5/2014.

Hamilton Mountain Trail, Columbia Gorge, WA, 5/2014.

This member of the buttercup family is seen at all elevations across most of the the Northeast, North-central, and Western U.S. (more…)


Windflower (Anemone deltoidea)

Rainy Lake Road, Columbia Gorge, OR, 6/2014.

Rainy Lake Road, Columbia Gorge, OR, 6/2014.

The genus name comes from the Greek anemos, meaning “wind”, so technically all anemones are “wind flowers,”  but this is the only western variety that is usually called by that name.  (more…)


White-veined Wintergreen (Pyrola picta)

Cone Peak Trail, near Iron Mountain, OR, 7/2014.

Cone Peak Trail, near Iron Mountain, OR, 7/2014.

 

Compare to Bog Wintergreen. (more…)


Lyall’s Anemone (Anemone lyallii)

Mt. Hood N.W.A., OR, 7/2012.

Named after David Lyall (1817-1895), a globetrotting Scottish botanist, surgeon, and British Naval officer, who spent time and discovered plants in Greenland, both poles, New Zealand, the Mediterranean, and the pacific northwest.   (more…)


Bog Wintergreen (Pyrola asarifolia)

Bull of the Woods W.A., OR, 7/2012.

…more…